Columbia always has many talks, lectures, and events going on, including our Graduate Student Colloquium Series, University Seminars Program, and events of the Center for the Ancient Mediterranean. Visit our Events page for scheduled talks.

The Classics Colloquium is usually held every second Tuesday at 4:10 in the afternoon at Hamilton 603. Talks are followed by a reception and a dinner for reserved guests. For more details, please refer to the Events calendar or contact co-organizers Elizabeth Heintges (emh2130@columbia.edu)  or Barbara Vinck (bev2106@columbia.edu).

The University Seminar in Classical Civilization takes place the fourth Thursday of each month during the semester, at the Columbia University Faculty House.  Lectures begin at 7:30 p.m. and are preceded by drinks and dinner for reserved guests.  For more details, please contact the rapporteur, Anna Conser, at adc2162@columbia.edu.  A schedule of upcoming events can be found here.

CLASSICS AND CLASSICAL STUDIES TEAM-TEACHING PEDAGOGY COLLOQUIUM

Mathias Hanes, Team-Teaching Pedagogy Colloquium 2014

Mathias Hanes, Team-Teaching Pedagogy Colloquium 2014

James Uden, Team-Teaching Pedagogy Colloquium 2014

James Uden, Team-Teaching Pedagogy Colloquium 2014

The Classics and Classical Studies Team-Teaching Pedagogy Colloquium (TTPC) provides a forum for exploring topics crucial to the teaching of Greek and Latin and the Humanities more generally as well as for workshopping particular pedagogical practices and methods. Graduate students themselves design, research, and lead the presentations and workshops. Occasionally we invite faculty and recent graduates of our program, who are teaching elsewhere, to share their particular approach and expertise. We have investigated both theoretical and pragmatic questions such as: 

  • Teaching persona
  • Support resources
  • Grading, assessment, and developing effective testing techniques
  • Teaching portfolios and evaluations
  • “Flipping” the classroom
  • Sight-reading
  • Fostering discussion
  • The choice and use of secondary scholarship
  • Creative projects
  • “Engaged” pedagogy and difference in the Classics classroom
  • The use of papyri, epigraphy, and material culture
  • Navigating Greek accentuation
  • Teaching Classical Civilization outside Columbia

History

At Columbia we have a graduate student community that is uniquely invested in pedagogy in the Classical classroom. TTPC grew out of conversations amongst graduate colleagues and was formalized in 2013 by Joe Sheppard, currently a doctoral candidate teaching in the Core Curriculum here at Columbia University, and Caleb Dance, now of Washington & Lee University. Since its inception, graduate students in Classics, Classical Studies, and related fields have found TTPC to be an enormously productive and supportive forum for our professional development.