Oct
26
to Oct 27

CAM Conference in Memory of Professor Alan Cameron

Conference in Memory of Alan Cameron_small.jpg

The Center for the Ancient Mediterranean (CAM) at Columbia invites you to join us for "A Conference in Memory of Alan Cameron (1938-2017)" a two-day conference on Friday, October 26 and Saturday, October 27, 2018.


Registration is recommended, but all are welcome to attend. Please RSVP for the conference through the our website: http://www.centancmed.org/upcoming-events-1/2018/10/26/conference-in-memory-of-alan-cameron. For more information, visit the event page, or contact us directly with further questions.
Participants will include: Averil Cameron, Anne Chen, Raffaella Cribiore, Anthony Cutler, Jean-Luc Fournet, Carmela Franklin, Arianna Gullo, Gavin Kelly, Michael Kulikowski, Noel Lenski, Rita Lizzi Testa, Charlotte Roueché, and Michele Salzman.

The conference will take place on the 3rd floor of the Italian Academy, Columbia University. Please find the schedule below:
Friday, October 26

10:00-10:30: Introduction, Marc Van De Mieroop and John Ma

10:30-11:15: Arianna Gullo, “Late antique Homeric Exegesis in the Greek Anthology

11:15-12:00: Jean-Luc Fournet, "Returning to the Wandering Poets: a New Poem by Dioscorus of Aphrodite"

12:00-12:45: Gavin Kelly, “The Fragments of Rutilius Namatianus”

lunch

13:45-14:30: Michele Salzman, “Why Gibbon Was Wrong; The Case for A.D. 472 and the Fall of Rome”

14:30-15:15: Anthony Cutler, "Alan's 'Bare Basilius': when the historian and the art historian coalesce"

15:15-16:00: Anne Chen, “Late Antiquity Between East and West”

break

16:15-17:00: Averil Cameron, “Alan Cameron and Byzantium”


Saturday Oct 27

9:45-10:30: Rita Lizzi, “Alan Cameron and the Symmachi”

10:30-11:15: Raffaella Cribiore, “Stenographers in Late Antiquity: Villains or Victims?”

break

11:30-12:15: Charlotte Roueche, “Celebrity and Power: Circus Factions 40 years on”

12:15-13:00: Michael Kulikowski, “The Value of Minimalist Interpretation: The Historia Augusta”

lunch

14:00-14:45: Carmela Vircillo Franklin, “The Lost Farnesianus Manuscript: Uncial Capitals for the Bishops of Rome”

14:45-15:30: Noel Lenski, “Ambrose thinks with slavery”

15:30-16:00: Final words



We hope to see you there!

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Apr
28
2:00 PM14:00

Cicero in Context: Conference in Honor of Professor James E. G. Zetzel’s Retirement

  • Italian Academy at Columbia University (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Cicero Conference in honor of James E. G. Zetzel, Anthon Professor of the Latin Language and Literature, on the occasion of his retirement. Co-sponsored by the Center for the Ancient Mediterranean

Speakers include:

Professor Robert Kaster (Princeton University), Professor Peter White (University of Chicago), Professor Catherine Steel (University of Glasgow), and Carina de Klerk (Columbia).

Conference Program. Reception to follow.

RSVP

Cicero in Context - James Zetzel Conference.jpg
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Mar
31
8:00 PM20:00

Aristophanes' Frogs

The Barnard Columbia Ancient Drama Group is pleased to present Aristophanes' "Frogs." 

It’s 405 BCE and things aren’t looking too good. We’ve been at war for ages. We’ve lost money. We’ve lost men. A further and final blow—all the good tragedians are gone. Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, they’re all dead. Without our tragedians, we’re totally screwed. But Dionysus, the god of theater himself, is coming to the rescue. He’s got a plan to save the day, a plan that is so good and so crazy that it could only ever be pulled off in a comedy. Zeus willing, if Zeus indeed exists, it will all work out for the best. 
Join us to see how it all pans out.

Poster (4).png

To make sure you get a ticket, please purchase your tickets in advance: https://www.eventbrite.com/o/barnard-columbia-ancient-drama-group-9867917254

The production is in Ancient Greek with English supertitles and is made possible by the Matthew Alan Kramer Fund. 
Directed by Carina de Klerk
Chorus and music directed by Brittany Johnson
Music by Nathan Katkin

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Mar
31
2:00 PM14:00

Aristophanes' Frogs

The Barnard Columbia Ancient Drama Group is pleased to present Aristophanes' "Frogs." 

It’s 405 BCE and things aren’t looking too good. We’ve been at war for ages. We’ve lost money. We’ve lost men. A further and final blow—all the good tragedians are gone. Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, they’re all dead. Without our tragedians, we’re totally screwed. But Dionysus, the god of theater himself, is coming to the rescue. He’s got a plan to save the day, a plan that is so good and so crazy that it could only ever be pulled off in a comedy. Zeus willing, if Zeus indeed exists, it will all work out for the best. 
Join us to see how it all pans out.

Poster (4).png

To make sure you get a ticket, please purchase your tickets in advance: https://www.eventbrite.com/o/barnard-columbia-ancient-drama-group-9867917254

The production is in Ancient Greek with English supertitles and is made possible by the Matthew Alan Kramer Fund. 
Directed by Carina de Klerk
Chorus and music directed by Brittany Johnson
Music by Nathan Katkin

View Event →
Mar
30
8:00 PM20:00

Aristophanes' Frogs

The Barnard Columbia Ancient Drama Group is pleased to present Aristophanes' "Frogs." 

It’s 405 BCE and things aren’t looking too good. We’ve been at war for ages. We’ve lost money. We’ve lost men. A further and final blow—all the good tragedians are gone. Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, they’re all dead. Without our tragedians, we’re totally screwed. But Dionysus, the god of theater himself, is coming to the rescue. He’s got a plan to save the day, a plan that is so good and so crazy that it could only ever be pulled off in a comedy. Zeus willing, if Zeus indeed exists, it will all work out for the best. 
Join us to see how it all pans out.

Poster (4).png

To make sure you get a ticket, please purchase your tickets in advance: https://www.eventbrite.com/o/barnard-columbia-ancient-drama-group-9867917254

The production is in Ancient Greek with English supertitles and is made possible by the Matthew Alan Kramer Fund. 
Directed by Carina de Klerk
Chorus and music directed by Brittany Johnson
Music by Nathan Katkin

View Event →
Mar
29
8:00 PM20:00

Aristophanes' Frogs

The Barnard Columbia Ancient Drama Group is pleased to present Aristophanes' "Frogs." 

It’s 405 BCE and things aren’t looking too good. We’ve been at war for ages. We’ve lost money. We’ve lost men. A further and final blow—all the good tragedians are gone. Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, they’re all dead. Without our tragedians, we’re totally screwed. But Dionysus, the god of theater himself, is coming to the rescue. He’s got a plan to save the day, a plan that is so good and so crazy that it could only ever be pulled off in a comedy. Zeus willing, if Zeus indeed exists, it will all work out for the best. 
Join us to see how it all pans out.

Poster (4).png

To make sure you get a ticket, please purchase your tickets in advance: https://www.eventbrite.com/o/barnard-columbia-ancient-drama-group-9867917254

The production is in Ancient Greek with English supertitles and is made possible by the Matthew Alan Kramer Fund. 
Directed by Carina de Klerk
Chorus and music directed by Brittany Johnson
Music by Nathan Katkin

View Event →
Mar
27
7:00 PM19:00

Found In Translation

  • American School of Classical Studies (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

 

A panel discussion with Karen Van Dyck, Alicia E. Stallings, ad Fr. John Raffan, moderated by Haris Vlavianos. Presented by the American School of Classical Studies & the Gennadius Library. For more information, or to stream this event live, click here.

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Feb
2
4:10 PM16:10

Classics Colloquium: Nicholas Rynearson

Plato’s Socratic Problem

We are accustomed to think of “Plato’s Socrates” as opposed to “Xenophon’s Socrates” or “the historical Socrates”. But the attentive reader will find many different Socrateses within Plato’s corpus. The multiplicity of Socrates in the dialogues reflects a deceptively simple but vitally important question for Plato: who (or what) is Socrates? Like the ti esti formula that characterizes many of the so-called early dialogues, this question seems always to end in aporia. In this paper, I explore some of the ways Plato multiplies Socrates in the dialogues, understanding them as strategies in Plato’s ongoing confrontation with his master’s mysterious opacity.

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Jan
26
4:10 PM16:10

Classics Colloquium: Hannah Čulik-Baird (Boston University)

Vetustas pauca non deprauat, multa tollit—loss and recovery of knowledge in the late Republic

How well do the Romans know their own history? In a world where records of the past rot away, are eaten by worms, mice, larvae, are accidentally or deliberately set on fire, how is a Roman of the late Republic supposed to understand Rome's past? In the De Lingua Latina (5.5), Varro wrote: uetustas pauca non deprauat, multa tollit; “there is little that time does not distort, much it obliterates completely.”  In the Academica (1.9), Cicero had said that, before Varro's books — "we were wandering and straying about like foreigners in our own city, and Varro's books led us, so to speak, right home again, and enabled us at last to realize who and where we were.” In this paper, I outline the challenges faced by late Republican Romans interested in understanding their city's history, and what kind of strategies they developed to recover "lost" knowledge. 

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