Undergraduate Honors and Prizes

The Classics Department congratulates its graduating seniors and is delighted to announce the following Honors and prizes:

DEPARTMENTAL HONORS
Lauren Nguyen

DOUGLAS GARDNER CAVERLY PRIZE
Lauren Nguyen

ERNEST STADLER PRIZE 
Margaret Corn and Hannah Loughlin

BENJAMIN F. ROMAINE PRIZE 
Peter Rachofsky

EARLE PRIZE
William Steere and Andrew Hauser

as well as

 New York Classical Club Recitation contest in Latin, 3rd Prize
Uwade Akhere

 Optime fecistis!

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2019 Barnard Columbia Ancient Drama Production of “Herakles" a Triumph (Complete With Aulos)

The Department of Classics extends its congratulations to the Barnard Columbia Ancient Drama Group, whose 2019 production of Herkales has been hailed as, “[…] something truly special — even beyond the obvious specialness that BCAD treats its audience to every year by performing classical plays in their original languages at such a remarkably high level — and the vision of the director, Caleb Simone, is to thank for bringing this year’s production together in such an innovative and compelling fashion.” Read the entire review, via Medium, here.

Via The New York Review of Books: “‘Nobody has ever made head or tail of Greek music, and nobody ever will,’ said the musicologist Wilfrid Perrett in 1932, quoting a classicist friend. ‘That way madness lies.’ In a sense this last statement was on the mark, for it was the “piping” of Madness, the malign deity of Euripides’s Herakles, that BCAD’s director and composers set out to replicate. Thanks to their efforts, a handful of lucky New Yorkers witnessed something remarkable this month: the awakening of a theatrical tradition that has lain dormant for more than two millennia.”

View a video of the production here.

Photo credit: Pamela Sisson

Photo credit: Pamela Sisson

Medea on Trial: A Conversation with Margaret Atwood and Lisa Dwan

Join the Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality on Thursday, March 28th, for Medea on Trial: A Conversation with Margaret Atwood and Lisa Dwan. The discussion will explore topics of feminism, symbolism, and justice, and will take place at 6pm at The Forum

RSVP is required to attend

To RSVP, please click here.

Additional information can be found on the IRWGS event page.

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Karen Van Dyck will give a lecture at the Institute for Ideas and Imagination in Paris

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Increasingly literature asks how to translate the foreign accents and multilingual idioms of the migrant. Two contemporary Greek novels–one about Greeks in the United States, the other about Greek Albanians in Greece–address this question by developing translingual practices that are themselves translational. Using hybrid creoles that blend languages through transliteration and homophony, these novels imagine translation solutions that challenge the hegemony of standardized national languages. The American case foregrounds the visual impenetrability of the new alphabet, while the Balkan case treats sound as a permeable means of encompassing ethnic differences. How might attention to translational poetics in the source text enable translators to be more experimental by exposing the instability and ideological import of the translating language? How might comparative studies of translingualism in literature and literary translation offer new categories for understanding migration? Van Dyck presents her work, with a response by Dimitris Christopoulos, President, International Federation for Human Rights (FIDH). Mark Mazower introducing.

The conference will be held Wednesday, March 20th, from 7-9 PM CET. Tickets can be found here.

Professor Karen Van Dyck, 2018-19 Fellow at the Columbia Institute for Ideas and Imagination

Professor Karen Van Dyck is a 2018-19 fellow at the Columbia Institute for Ideas and Imagination, which opened its doors in Paris in September 2018. Its purpose is to question the established ways in which knowledge is defined, produced, and taught.  More information about the CII&I and the 2018-19 Fellows can be found here.

Professor Van Dyck is pictured here, to the left of President Bollinger, at the CII&I inaugural event in Paris, January 2019.

Professor Van Dyck is pictured here, to the left of President Bollinger, at the CII&I inaugural event in Paris, January 2019.

Katharina Volk Receives Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities

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We're delighted to report that Prof. Katharina Volk is the recipient of a Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities, to be held in 2019-20. Katharina will be working on her project "The Politics of Knowledge in Late Republican Rome," a monograph on the intellectual history of the late Republic, which examines the intersections of scholarship, philosophy, and politics in this turbulent period. Katharina is thrilled about the award and looking forward to spending more quality time with her friends Cicero, Varro, and Nigidius Figulus.

Gareth Williams Selected as 2017-18 Lionel Trilling Award Recipient

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The Department of Classics is very pleased to announce that Gareth Williams, Violin Family Professor, has been selected as the recipient of the 2017-2018 Lionel Trilling Book Award.

Lionel Trilling CC'25, GSAS'38, a faculty member from 1927-1974, was one of the most significant 20th century public intellectuals. He became nationally known for both his scholarship and his literary criticism, which appealed to a wide audience. At Columbia, Trilling was recognized as a gifted and dedicated teacher with a special commitment to undergraduate education.

The Lionel Trilling Book Award is awarded annually to a faculty member who has published, in the previous year, the book that is deemed to best exhibit the standards of intellect and scholarship found in Trilling's work.

In awarding the Lionel Trilling Book Award to Professor Williams for his work entitled Pietro Bembo on Etna: The Ascent of a Venetian Humanist, the Committee chairs wrote that the book struck them and other students on the committee "as especially moving, stylistically brilliant and accessible, as well as informative."

Professor Williams will be honored at the Trilling/Van Doren Awards Ceremony on Wednesday, May 2, 6pm-8pm in Low Library, Faculty Room. RSVP to Jessica Cubas at jcc2239@columbia.edu

Cicero in Context: Conference in Honor of Professor James E. G. Zetzel’s Retirement

Cicero Conference in honor of James E. G. Zetzel, Anthon Professor of the Latin Language and Literature, on the occasion of his retirement. Co-sponsored by the Center for the Ancient Mediterranean

Speakers include:

Professor Robert Kaster (Princeton University), Professor Peter White (University of Chicago), Professor Catherine Steel (University of Glasgow), and Carina de Klerk (Columbia).

Conference Program. Reception to follow.

RSVP

Professor Alan Cameron (1938-2017)

Alan Cameron, the Charles Anthon Professor Emeritus of Latin and Literature at Columbia University, died on July 31st at the age of 79 in New York while receiving treatment for complications arising from ALS. Alan was educated at St. Paul’s School in London, and at New College, Oxford, where he was awarded a first class degree in Literae Humaniores in 1961. Without ever needing to complete a Phd, a point of considerable amusement and pride, Alan took up teaching positions in Glasgow and London before joining the Columbia faculty in 1977; he remained in the department until his retirement in 2008.

Alan had an unrivalled expertise in the history and literature of Hellenistic Greece and Late Antiquity and an infallible command of Greek and Latin philology that included both the canonical and more recondite areas of the corpus. Combining his impeccable knowledge with innovative approaches, an engaging style, and a zest for challenging and upending long-established views, Alan produced scholarship that ranged as broadly as its learning was deep. His publication record runs to many pages (over 200 articles plus more than a dozen books), and his discussions remain ‘must read’ items for those in any number of different areas, religion, social and political history, mythology, and the history of classical scholarship among them. Among his most ground-breaking books are Circus Factions: Blues and Greens at Rome and Byzantium (1976), Callimachus and his Critics (winner of the APA Goodwin Prize in 1997), Greek Mythography in the Roman World (2004) and The Last Pagans of Rome (2011), and a sampling of only his most recent essays (‘Psyche and her Sisters’, ‘Black and White: A Note on Ancient Nicknames’, ‘On the Date of John of Gaza’ and ‘Notes on the Erotic Art of Rufinus’) stands testament to Alan’s boundless intellectual range and curiosity as well as his facility for eye-catching titles.

In addition to his tireless scholarly activity, his participation in conferences and willingness to deliver lectures in many parts of the world, and the recognition he received in the form of many honors (among them he was made a fellow of the British Academy in 1975 and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1978), Alan was an immensely popular and much revered teacher at all levels. Generations of Columbia graduate students, as well as some of Alan’s colleagues, remember with particular fondness and gratitude the classes in Greek and Latin Verse Composition that he used to hold at his New York home. Endlessly hospitable and with friends across the globe, Alan also found time to swim, bike, travel, cultivate a taste for films of sometimes questionable artistic merit, and, as a school boy in company with Martin West, to be one among the three members of the St. Paul’s Astronomy Club.

My colleagues at Columbia and I are deeply saddened by the loss, and extend our deepest condolences to Alan’s wife Carla, his son and daughter and his recently born and much anticipated first grandchild, Silas, whom Alan was able to meet shortly before his death. As more information becomes available about memorial arrangements, we will communicate it here.

Deborah Steiner

John Jay Professor of Greek and Latin

Chair

Department of Classics

Austerity Measures Reading

This powerful bilingual anthology of poetry is a display of resilience and beauty, showcasing the richness and strength of contemporary Greek poetry. According to Kate Kellaway, writing for The Observer, the book provides “an uncommon chance to share Greek experience beyond the headlines—in a way that is fascinating, revelatory and only possible through poetry.” 

Karen Van Dyck is the Kimon A. Doukas Professor of Modern Greek Literature in the Classics Department at Columbia University. She writes on modern Greek and Greek diaspora literature, and gender and translation theory.

Read by Karen Van Dyck.

Fri, June 2, 2017, 7-8pm

Bohemian National Hall, 3rd Floor, BBLA Library

321 East 73rd Street

New York, NY 10021

RSVP: eventbrite.com

                     

Claire Catenaccio (PhD 2017) joins the faculty of Duke University!

We are very happy to announce that (the newly minted) Dr. Claire Catenaccio will be joining the Department of Classical Studies at Duke University as an Assistant Professor in Fall 2017! Claire, who specializes in ancient drama and performance, recently defended her dissertation, entitled "Monody and Dramatic Technique in Late Euripides." Claire has played an active role in the Classics department community, directing several of our annual Greek and Latin plays, including Seneca's Thyestes, Euripides' Alcestis, and an adaptation of Book 9 of Homer's Iliad. While we will miss her presence at Columbia, we wish her all the best in her new position at Duke!
 

Charles McNamara (PhD 2016) - 2016-2017 SCS/NEH Fellow at the Thesaurus Linguae Latinae

Dr. Charles McNamara, one of our recent graduates, has been working as a SCS/NEH Fellow at the Thesaurus Linguae Latinae in Munich, Germany over the course of the past year. Charley's work at the TLL has included writing articles on the words nervosusremisceo, remollio, remoror, remunerator, ren, and renideo. We can't wait to read Charley's entries!
 

PSL-Columbia Exchange

On May 5-6, a number of Columbia faculty and graduate students flew to Paris to participate in a collaboration with PSL (Paris Sciences et Lettres). The 2-day conference focused on "How to read: objects, images, texts" and put scholars from a number of fields (Classics, Art History & Archaeology, East Asian Studies, and History) in dialogue with one another. The Classics Department is looking forward to welcoming our PSL colleagues when they come to Columbia in September for a parallel event. For a program of the May event, please visit this webpage.
 

 

Back row (left to right): Joseph Howley (Classics, Columbia), Michael Economou (History, Columbia), Bilal Annan (EPHE), Pierre-Philippe Corriger (EPHE), François Queyrel (EPHE), Stéphane Verger (EPHE/ENS), David Lurie (EALAC, Columbia), Marcus Folch (Classics, Columbia), Mary-Evelyn Farrior (Classical Studies, Columbia), Morgan Belzic (EPHE)  Front row (left to right): Elizabeth Heintges (Classics, Columbia), Martin Szewczyk (EPHE), John Ma (Classics, Columbia), Francesco de Angelis (Art History & Archaeology, Columbia)

Back row (left to right): Joseph Howley (Classics, Columbia), Michael Economou (History, Columbia), Bilal Annan (EPHE), Pierre-Philippe Corriger (EPHE), François Queyrel (EPHE), Stéphane Verger (EPHE/ENS), David Lurie (EALAC, Columbia), Marcus Folch (Classics, Columbia), Mary-Evelyn Farrior (Classical Studies, Columbia), Morgan Belzic (EPHE)

Front row (left to right): Elizabeth Heintges (Classics, Columbia), Martin Szewczyk (EPHE), John Ma (Classics, Columbia), Francesco de Angelis (Art History & Archaeology, Columbia)

(from left to right): Li Feng (EALAC, Columbia), Joseph Howley (Classics, Columbia), Stéphane Verger (EPHE/ENS), François Queyrel (EPHE), David Lurie (EALAC, Columbia), Marcus Folch (Classics, Columbia), Ludovic Laugier (Musée du Louvre), Michael Economou (History, Columbia), Francesco De Angelis (Art History & Archaeology, Columbia), John Ma (Classics, Columbia), Andreas Stauder (EPHE), Mary-Evelyn Farrior (Classical Studies, Columbia), Olivier Venture (EPHE), Elizabeth Heintges (Classics, Columbia), Jules Buffet (EPHE), Martin Szewczyk (EPHE), Morgan Belzic (EPHE), Florence Monier (CNRS/ENS), Pierre-Philippe Corriger (EPHE).  

(from left to right): Li Feng (EALAC, Columbia), Joseph Howley (Classics, Columbia), Stéphane Verger (EPHE/ENS), François Queyrel (EPHE), David Lurie (EALAC, Columbia), Marcus Folch (Classics, Columbia), Ludovic Laugier (Musée du Louvre), Michael Economou (History, Columbia), Francesco De Angelis (Art History & Archaeology, Columbia), John Ma (Classics, Columbia), Andreas Stauder (EPHE), Mary-Evelyn Farrior (Classical Studies, Columbia), Olivier Venture (EPHE), Elizabeth Heintges (Classics, Columbia), Jules Buffet (EPHE), Martin Szewczyk (EPHE), Morgan Belzic (EPHE), Florence Monier (CNRS/ENS), Pierre-Philippe Corriger (EPHE).
 

Book Launch for Karen Van Dyck's "Austerity Measures: The New Greek Poetry"

Since the crisis hit in 2008, Greece has played host to a cultural renaissance unlike anything seen in the country for over thirty years. In Austerity Measures, the very best of the writing to emerge from that creative ferment—much of it never before translated into English—is gathered for the first time, featuring poems written by native Greeks, émigrés and migrants alike. Yanis Varoufakis calls it "living proof that the Greek crisis is of global significance."  We will be joined by editor Karen Van Dyck and poets Maria Margaronis, Hiva Panahi, Gazmend Kapllani, Stephanos Papadopoulos, and Yusef Komunyakaa. Co-sponsored by Black Sea Networks at Columbia University. More details are available here

 

Event date: 

Tuesday, March 21, 2017 - 7:00pm

Book Launch for Marcus Folch's "The City and the Stage"

You are invited to the book launch cocktail party for Professor Marcus Folch's new book, "The City and the Stage" published by Oxford Univeristy Press.  
The party will be held on Wednesday April 27th, 2016 from 6:00 to 8:00 PM at the Faculty House Ivy Lounge & Coffee Bar, 64 Morningside Drive

 

THE CITY AND THE STAGE

PERFORMANCE, GENRE, AND GENDER IN PLATO'S LAWS

Marcus Folch

DESCRIPTION

What role did poetry, music, song, and dance play in the social and political life of the ancient Greek city? How did philosophy respond to, position itself against, and articulate its own ambitions in relation to the poetic tradition? How did ancient philosophers theorize and envision alternatives to fourth-century Athenian democracy? The City and the Stage poses such questions in a study of the Laws, Plato's last, longest, and unfinished philosophical dialogue. Reading the Laws in its literary, historical, and philosophical contexts, this book offers a new interpretation of Plato's final dialogue with the Greek poetic tradition and an exploration of the dialectic between philosophy and mimetic art. Although Plato is often thought hostile to poetry and famously banishes mimetic art from the ideal city of the Republic, The City and the Stage shows that in his final work Plato made a striking about-face, proposing to rehabilitate Athenian performance culture and envisaging a city, Magnesia, in which poetry, music, song, and dance are instrumental in the cultivation of philosophical virtues. Plato's views of the performative properties of music, dance, and poetic language, and the psychological underpinnings of aesthetic experience receive systematic treatment in this book for the first time. The social role of literary criticism, the power of genres to influence a society and lead to specific kinds of constitutions, performance as a mechanism of gender construction, and the position of women in ancient Greek performance culture are central themes throughout this study. A wide-ranging examination of ancient Greek philosophy and fourth-century intellectual culture, The City and the Stage will be of significance to anyone interested in ancient Greek literature, performance, and Platonic philosophy in its historical contexts.

Columbia University Ancient World Graduate Student Conference: Abstract Deadline

REFUGE AND REFUGEES IN THE ANCIENT WORLD

November 11-12, 2016. Columbia University in the City of New York

Abstracts are due by May 2, 2016. Please email cuconference2016@gmail.com

We invite papers from graduate students working across disciplines related to the ancient world for a two-day conference which will explore the issues of refuge and refugees. From representations of refugees and the notions of “refuge” to their physical traces in the archaeological record, we hope to discuss how ancient societies experienced and conceptualized the flight and plight of displaced peoples.

In light of the recent upsurge in work on ancient Mediterranean migration and exile, as well as current events, new questions arise: What heuristic value does the term “refugee” have for our understanding of the ancient equivalent? How do we define refuge and refugees? Where do we look for the voices of refugees among the ancient evidence? What and where are the sites of “refuge” attested across the ancient Mediterranean world?

We welcome papers in any disciplinary field––and interdisciplinary approaches are encouraged––pertaining to the ancient Mediterranean world and surrounding regions, including Egypt, the Near East and the expanses of the Roman Empire, and falling within the period spanning from the Bronze Age to Late Antiquity.